Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann by Realsamples: The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian-Built Instruments

  • By: Thorsten Meyer
  • Date: Wednesday, 9 March 2022
  • Time to read: 5 min.

The harpsichord is a keyboard instrument that was popular in the Baroque period. It produces a sound that is similar to a piano but has a more delicate texture. In this blog post, we will be discussing the Realsamples Austrian Harpsichord library.

Austrian Harpsichord Edition Beurmann by Realsamples The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian Built Instruments 1200x627 1
Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann by Realsamples The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian-Built Instruments

Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann by Realsamples

This library features an instrument built by Johann Anton Miklis in 1671 in Prague. The harpsichord offers all three sounds of the instrument – the sonorous 8-foot stop, the sweet and jangly 4-foot stop, and the recorded combination of both. If you are looking for a rich and slinky-sounding harpsichord, then this library is definitely for you!

Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann 

The Austrian Harpsichord Library houses an instrument created by Johann Anton Miklis in 1671 in Prague, which was owned by Austria at the time. It has three notes – 8′, 4′ register, and a combination of both – demonstrating the deep and sinuous quality of Austrian-built instruments that Mozart would have played.

The harpsichord is characterized by its lavish and sinuous tone. It’s likely that Mozart would have been familiar with Austrian-built instruments, as they sound similar to the ones he played. The Realsamples Austrian Harpsichord library includes a harpsichord created by Johann Anton Miklis in 1671 in Prague (which was an Austrian city at the time).

The instrument is not touch-sensitive like a piano, as with all harpsichords. However, striking a note might not always produce the same result due to differences in soundboard and string resonances.

This pack contains all three tones of the instrument — a sonorous 8-foot stop, a pleasant and jangly 4-foot stop, and a recorded combination of both.

Almost 1.600 single recordings are available in the sample library. Many samplers have previously used the same digital sample of a harpsichord. Realsamples used up to eight variations of each note in order to avoid the machine-like effect. The delicate key release noises were recorded using four samples per note.

The Valotti-tuning of the harpsichord is 392 Hz, as indicated in its original label. Presets with a 440 Hz pitch and equal temperament tuning are also accessible.

Austrian Harpsichord Edition Beurmann by Realsamples The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian Built Instruments
Austrian Harpsichord - Edition Beurmann by Realsamples: The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian-Built Instruments 4

Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann

It is downsampled from its original 192 kHz/24 bit frequency to 44.1 kHz/24 bit before being recorded. The song was previously sampled at 192 kHz/24 bit and is now downsampled to 44.1 kHz/24 bit. It was included in the collection put together by musicologist Andreas Beurmann.

Conclusion

The Realsamples Austrian Harpsichord library features an instrument built by Johann Anton Miklis in 1671 in Prague. This harpsichord offers all three sounds of the instrument – the sonorous 8-foot stop, the sweet and jangly 4-foot stop, and the recorded combination of both. If you are looking for a rich and slinky-sounding harpsichord, then this library is definitely for you!

Austrian Harpsichord Edition Beurmann by Realsamples The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian Built Instruments 970x250 1
Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann by Realsamples The Rich and Slinky Texture of Austrian-Built Instruments

Austrian Harpsichord FAQ

What is the difference between a harpsichord and a piano?

The main difference between a harpsichord and a piano is that the former is not touch-sensitive. With a harpsichord, you have to hit the key with the same force in order to produce the desired sound. Pianos are more forgiving in this regard, as you can vary the intensity of your playing. Additionally, harpsichords usually have strings that run parallel to one another, while pianos have strings that cross each other. This makes the latter instrument louder and brighter sounding than its Baroque counterpart.

What type of tuning does an Austrian Harpsichord use?

An Austrian Harpsichord uses Valotti tuning, which is 392 Hz. There are also presets available that use 440 Hz tuning and equal temperament.

How many samples are included in the library?

The Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann library includes almost 1600 single recordings. This ensures that you will get a realistic sounding harpsichord no matter what note you play. Additionally, four different samples were used to capture the key release noises for a more lifelike experience.

What is the Valotti-tuning of an Austrian Harpsichord?

The Valotti-tuning of an Austrian Harpsichord is 392 Hz. This means that the pitch of each note is lowered by a whole step when compared to the standard concert pitch (440 Hz).

How many variations of each note are included in the library?

There are up to eight variations of each note included in the Austrian Harpsichord – Edition Beurmann library. This prevents the harpsichord from sounding too machine-like when playing repeated notes.

Is the harpsichord touch-sensitive?

The Austrian Harpsichord is not touch-sensitive, which is true for all harpsichords. This means that you have to hit each key with the same force in order to produce a consistent sound.

What is the difference between an Austrian Harpsichord and other types of harpsichords?

Austrian Harpsichords are known for their rich and slinky texture. This is due to the way they are built, with strings that run parallel to one another. Additionally, the Valotti-tuning gives these instruments a unique sound that is different from other types of harpsichords.

How many stops does an Austrian Harpsichord have?

An Austrian Harpsichord has three stops: a sonorous eight-foot stop, a sweet and jangly four-foot stop, and a recorded combination of both. This allows you to create a variety of sounds with your instrument.

Can I use an Austrian Harpsichord in my compositions?

Yes, you can definitely use an Austrian Harpsichord in your compositions. The library includes presets that are compatible with a variety of DAWs, as well as MIDI files for added flexibility. You can also adjust the tuning and key to match the sound you are looking for.

What is the difference between a harpsichord and a clavichord?

The main difference between a harpsichord and a clavichord is that the former has strings that run parallel to one another, while the latter has strings that cross each other. This makes the clavichord louder and brighter sounding than its Baroque counterpart. Additionally, the clavichord is touch-sensitive, while the harpsichord is not. This means that you can vary the intensity of your playing on a clavichord, while harpsichords are more consistent in terms of sound.

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